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exit10-exodus.com is a scam

I don’t believe I fell for this, but I did.

I saw a Facebook ad promising to give me some money (10 EXIT) for trying out a mobile web version of Exodus. I really wanted to see a mobile app that didn’t require installation.

I’m greedy for freebies, so I clicked. It asked for my 12 word recovery phrase.

I typed it in. That was STUPID, but I did it.

I really wasn’t thinking.

Within a day, $26 worth of BCH was taken from the wallet.

Fortunately, the other coin wasn’t worth enough to steal.

This could have been a lot worse.

There’s no recovery from a heist like this. I will need to create a new wallet, and move the remaining funds (a whopping $6 of BSV) over to it. Click the link to get the instructions from the Exodus website.

Here’s a brief description of my process, on MINT Linux:

  1. create a new user account. I’m using Linux, so I do that in the “Settings”.
  2. Lock the screen, and switch to the other user.
  3. Start Exodus there, and it’ll create a fresh wallet.
  4. At this point, you will need a way to copy receiver addresses from one account to the other. You cannot use copy-paste.
    1. What I did was use the “Notes” feature in LastPass. You can use any note app that saves data to the network.
    2. Create a receiver address for each coin you are going to transfer.
    3. Put that info into the Notes.
  5. Next, make a backup of the wallet. This will require creating a new password, and will show a new 12-word seed.
  6. Print out the seed, or, do what I did, which was to type it into the LastPass note. I know, this is not totally secure, but it’s what I did. A printout is better.
  7. Switch users again, by locking the screen, and then switching users.
  8. To synchronize the LastPass notes, I logged out of LastPass and logged back in.
  9. Go into the compromized Exodus wallet and send your coin to the new receiver addresses.
  10. Next up, quit Exodus, and delete the old wallet files. In my case, they were in ~/.config/Exodus.
  11. Start up Exodus, and go through the backup restoration process.

I really should use a printed backup, but my filing and living situation is a bit to chaotic. The printout needs to be stored in multiple, well labeled locations, with instructions.

While $26 is not a lot of money, it could have been used to buy some food.

I’m reporting exit10-exodus.com to Fcebook.

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Buying Stuff for FREE On Here with Cryptocurrency

It’s simple:

If you have some cryptocurrency, and wish to buy something here, that can be arranged.

The easiest way is to use Coinbase. There are many good exchanges out there, but Coinbase seems to be the easiest for newbies. The best thing is, you can get “free money” from Coinbase to pay for the stuff.

Free Money

Coinbase has a “rewards” program where you get paid (in cryptocurrencies) to watch short videos and take easy quizzes.

The rewards are small – $3 or so is typical – but, over time, they can appreciate in value as the interest in the currency increases. Here’s what I’ve made in rewards so far (as of May 10, 2021):

It’s a little over $200, for watching instructional videos.

The ones at the top, I watched around a year ago. They’ve appreciated in value, a lot!

The ones at the bottom, I watched recently, and they dropped in value, though, not too much. Also, it’s not like I put any money into the system. This was free money.

Sign up with Coinbase through this link, and I might get a commission if you buy crypto on there.

The Videos

The videos weren’t boring. They were short explainers that described each cryptocurrency. Each is trying to find a niche in this new financial system. Watching the videos helps you learn about the product, and also, cryptocurrency in general.

Whether you think bitcoin is legit, or a big ponzi scam, you can still watch these videos and learn how these companies/capitalists are thinking.

Odds are, nearly all these products will “fail” and be swallowed up by a bigger company. That’s just capitalist consolidation. In the meantime, they are flush with venture capital money, and trying to get mindshare.

This gives the entire system a kind of flaky, bullshitty quality. It’s slick, but seems fake.

It’s not really “fake”: it’s promotional.

The companies are trying to identify and build lists of early adopters who are open to taking financial risks. At this point, we are not “early adopters”, but the people who come after the early adopters, but we are still a valuable customers, because we take risks.

Customer acquisition costs in finance are, according to a random blog I found, $175 per customer.

Think about those numbers above: they paid $3 in fake money to get me to watch a video, and now, I’m blogging about them. Holy moly, talk about “growth hacking”.

Buying Stuff Here

Anything I have in here, in inventory, or on Ebay, you can buy with crypto.

For example, I have a book and DVD combo for sale on Ebay for $8 + shipping. The shipping comes out to around $4. So the total is $12.

Coinbase will do transfers of crypto between users, for free. No fees. (Normally, on an Ebay sale, I pay 13% in various fees to complete a sale.)

So, you transfer $12 worth of crypto to me, and I’ll delete the listing on Ebay, and mail the product out to you.

The trade will need to be arranged online, through chat. You can reach me through the contact form. Contact me there, I’ll set up a chat and we can walk through the process.

The info I’ll need are: your mailing address, what you want to buy, and your Coinbase contact.

If you want to see what else I have for sale, using “funny money”, so you can get big discounts, check out my Listia and Simbi accounts. Both will give you free “coin”, so you can get stuff for the cost of shipping.

How to Time the Market

Watch videos when the market is down. Then, later, when the market is up, you can turn around and convert the coin into one of the stablecoins, or spend them by transferring them to me, to get goods in return.

My general policy will be to convert the coin into a stablecoin, or convert to a staking coin that’s down.

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Door Handle Inside Interior Blue Driver Side LH Left for 93-97 Corolla Prizm

I just got this, and installed it. I’m hoping it works out better than the previous handle(s).

A few years back, I purchased a four-pack of door handles, and installed them. Some worked, but some promptly broke within months.

The singles ones might last longer. They cost more, and they have an “UH” logo on them.

The cheaper ones in a four pack don’t have the logo, and have a red plastic sleeve.

I suspect the four-pack is for dealers selling used cars, to fix up a car for sale, so all the handles are the same color and new.

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Curve Headset by Sentry from DD’s Discount, Cheap

These are shaped like Apple earpod headsets, but with a rubberized surface, and in different colors. The audio is mediocre, with a thin bass, but the microphone is quite loud. The mic hangs a little bit low, so be careful about dragging it across your clothes.

All in all, a decent super-cheap headset. I’ve paid more for worse, unfortunately.

Update: the connector is flaky. It might be a broken wire, or a bad plug. This didn’t last long.

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Skullcandy Simple Headphones Blue, Skullcandy Ink’d Headset from Ross, Cheap

These were $4 for a pair, and I thought I was getting a headset, but it’s just headphones. Headphones with no mic! Arrgh. I had to go and buy a headset. Fortunately, it was cheap, and these are good. They come with two sizes of silicone plugs, so you can get a comfortable fit. The audio quality is solid, with a nice bass.

Generally, I’ve had good luck with Skullcandy brand headphones. The audio is good. The build quality is pretty good – not as good as Apple and other higher-end products, but solid. The price is fairly high, if you don’t get this kind of closeout.

This was a $5 pair, and is the best headset I’ve had in this price range. Key features:

  • good mic, and not too sensitive (too sensitive turns out to be a problem because it pick up noise)
  • decent wire that doesn’t break
  • low price as usual
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Sold: Vintage Rice Cookers: National Rice-O-Mat SR-18E in Chrome, Hitachi Chime Omatic RD-4053

For sale: The Hitachi on Ebay.

For sale: The National on Ebay.

Showa Retro home appliances. These are two classics, the single-button National, which is probably from the 1960s, and the switch-and-button RD-4053 that must have been in production into the 1990s.

Following on the heels of the successful Toshiba ER series rice cookers, Matshushita, under the National brand, produced a similar rice cooker that required only a single inner pot.

The National rice cookers would become hugely successful around the world, and are still produced under the Panasonic brand. This style is still available outside the US, in some parts of Asia. (The Panasonic brand started as “National Panasonic”, and then just Panasonic. The company eventually changed its name to Panasonic.)

Meanwhile, the Toshiba design would be exported to Taiwan and produced by Tatung (Datung), and its successors are still in production today.

Hitachi’s innovation was obvious: there’s an on-off switch, so the cooker can be kept warm.

The switch enables you to keep the appliance plugged in. By this time, all rice cookers had a stay-warm mode, to keep the rice hot, so the bacteria would not grow. In Japanese households, the rice cooker was, basically, always on, because rice was eaten with every meal. There was no need for an “off” state.

In the US, the power switch allowed you to shut the cooker off, wash it out, and then keep it on the counter for the next use, which might be more than one day in the future.

The Chime-Omatic did exceedingly well in Cajun country.

The National cooker is unusual in that it sports a chrome finish. The iconic rice cooker came in white. Some were painted in an ivory or creme color. I never saw chrome until I bought this cooker.

References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_cooker

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Sold: Cookbook for Robert and Mary Fujioka Mid-Century Industrial Designer

For sale on Ebay: https://www.ebay.com/itm/264388678548

Community created cookbook for Fujioka anniversary. Many different recipes with a fairly large number of Japanese American community recipes.

Possible connection via USC Industrial Design school, search for “Alumni with Designs for an Industrial Archive

Possible connection of Robert Fujioka to the company Design West as founder. Search for “pacific citizen a strong bond continues“. He may have been an internee at Manzanar relocation camp, and went to design school at USC.

Search for “California Design 9 1965 by MR Design” and search for “design west” within it for examples of Design West products.

Design West Incorporated 3669 W. 6th St, Los Angeles – associated with designing classic Samsonite attache case of the 1960s. Search for LA Times article “Design West Plans to Market the Goods It Styles

From the LA Times article:
So, when Samsonite, then Fujioka’s and Ellsworth’s principal client, offered to make Design West a wholly owned subsidiary with few strings attached, the partners readily accepted.

Over the next several years, Design West created the look of Samsonite’s patio furniture, luggage, brief cases and folding chairs and tables in addition to handling a variety of outside clients.

From the Pacific Citizen article:

He started high school in Chicago, working after hours to support himself. When the group’s sponsor, Mr. Temple, died of a heart attack after their arrival in Chicago, Robert said, I was told that I had to leave the city because I had no sponsor.” He moved to Minneapolis to finish high school, graduating in 1943 while working at night at a foundry shoveling charcoal and later at a granary to support himself. After high school he started college after being told the Navy and Air Force would not let him enlist. A quarter and a half into college, with the war still going on in Europe, he was drafted into the Army, serving two years in the infantry and avoided being deployed to Europe because the war ended.

Fujioka returned to West Los Angeles, living in a boarding house, and attending the University of Southern California on the G.I. Bill majoring in industrial design.

While living in West Los Angeles, Robert Fujioka said he knew of the Yoshiro “Babe” and Shizuko Fujioka family (the “other Robert Fujioka at the reunion) because they lived across the street from the boarding house where he stayed. He met with the “other Fujioka family” while at the reunion.

Robert’s wife, Mary (née Honda), was sent to Manzanar at the beginning of the war when she was 11-1/2 years old, but unlike his brief stay there, she was in the camp from 1942 until August of 1945. They met when her family moved to West Los Angeles when Manzanar closed and according to Robert she walked by his boarding house one day and he called out to her, “What’s your name?” and that, as he said with a grin, “was the being of a beautiful relationship that has lasted through 60 years of marriage.” They have one son whose name is Mark.

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Toshiba ER-8 Rice Cooker, Historic 炊飯器

Up for Auction: Toshiba ER-8 Rice Cooker, Historic 炊飯器

The Toshiba ER-8 is a larger version of the ER-4, the original rice cooker to gain widespread acceptance in the Japanese market.

The main difference from the later style is that there’s an outer pot and an inner pot, and the timing was controlled by adding water between the two pots. The water would boil, and the heat and steam would cook the food.

This design is no longer sold by Toshiba, but Taiwanese industrial Tatung has a copycat cooker that is still in production and can be purchased new for around $130.

I have listed mine for sale in the 300s, but others are selling these at much lower prices.

These are opportunities to buy historic products at low prices. It appears that, after the ER series, the product was given “RC”, which continues to the present day.

The early models employed the pot-within-a-pot style, rather than the single pot used in current cookers.

A sale concluded in January 2020, a Toshiba RC-10H, for 39.95 + free shipping.

Seller ebernardo98 has two for sale:

Toshiba RC-10H New in original box.

Toshiba RC-10B in original box.

Seller vquillen18 is selling a vintage Toshiba RC-4B.

The RC-180D may also be a pot-within-a-pot style cooker, but it’s hard to be certain.